Are anonymous calls enough to pull car over? Supreme Court considers

Updated:

WASHINGTON —

The U.S. Supreme Court is considering how police respond to a common road rage scenario.

A driver speeding recklessly runs a car off the road. A witness calls 911, reporting the dangerous driver.

The key question for justices is whether police need evidence beyond an anonymous 911 tip to pursue that car.

California and the Obama Administration argue that lives are at stake if police have to hold back.

But attorneys for the driver at the center of the case, Lorenzo Navarette, argue the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution requires more than a nameless tip for police to pursue a suspect.

What do you think -- should an anonymous call be enough for police to pull a car over? Join the conversation on our official WPXI-TV Facebook page.