Council member demands action following officer's handling of 911 call

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PITTSBURGH —

A local woman’s death could lead to new domestic violence training for Pittsburgh police officers.

Officers were dispatched to Ka’Sandra Wade’s home after she called 911 on New Year’s Eve. However, the officer spoke with Wade’s boyfriend, Anthony Brown, and left before checking on her.

“A male came to the window and said everything was OK. He refused to answer any more questions. I’m back,” the officer told a 911 dispatcher.

According to police, less than a day later Brown shot and killed Wade before killing himself.

City Council Member Ricky Burgess said he doesn’t want to wait for the investigation into the officer’s actions surrounding Wade’s murder.

“Our city needs to change its policies so that it can prevent incidents like this from occurring in the future,” Burgess said.

The program would give police extensive training on domestic violence and teach them how to deal with possible victims while they call a domestic violence hotline.

“If the person decides not to use the hotline, the officer will sit down and show them what the risk factors are, and what triggers they may face in the future,” Burgess said.

Tim Stevens, the head of the Black Political Empowerment Project, is also calling for change.

“All police officers should be given an update on procedures and policy of what to do with a 911 call, particularly when it’s a female caller expressing some kind of a problem,” Stevens said.

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