Knitters needed to create purple caps for babies

by: Natalie Dreier, Cox Media Group National Content Desk Updated:

If you know how to knit or crochet, then the Oklahoma State Department of Health can use your help.

The department is in need of knitters to help make purple knit caps for newborns as part of its campaign to highlight “Period of PURPLE Crying.”

Doctors say that from the age of 2 weeks to about 3 or 4 months, babies will cry and cannot be soothed. Babies can cry for hours, but they are not sick or in pain. They are just crying. It is usually called colic, but some doctors are trying to move away from that diagnosis, saying it has connotations of there being something wrong with the baby. But they say it is a part of normal development.


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That’s why they’re trying to change it from colic to “The Period of PURPLE Crying.”

PURPLE is an acronym that stands for:

  • P - Peak of crying
  • U - Unexpected
  • R - Resists Soothing
  • P - Pain-like face
  • L - Long lasting
  • E - Evening

At the same time, the department of health has found that this is the time that babies are at risk for Shaken Baby Syndrome.

According to dontshake.org, there are about 1,300 cases of Shaken Baby Syndrome every year in the United States. Most victims are less than 6 months old and it is the leading cause of child abuse deaths in the U.S.

To spread awareness, the state will distribute 4,300 purple knit caps to every baby born in 41 hospitals in Oklahoma in November and December, Good Housekeeping reported.

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The hats should be made of any shade of purple soft, baby yarn. There could be other colors involved but at least 50 percent of the hat should be purple. There should be no strings or straps or other choking hazards. And while hats can be received throughout the year, the ones intended for the November and December distribution must be received by Oct. 1, Good Housekeeping reported.

 

Mail hats to:

Oklahoma State Department of Health

ATTN: Maternal and Child Health

1000 NE 10 St.

Oklahoma City, OK 73117-1299.

Click here for the patterns and guidelines.

 

File photo
Natalie Behring/Getty Images


 

 

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