Child recovering in Pittsburgh hospital after swallowing fidget spinner battery

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A child is recovering in Pittsburgh Thursday night after doctors said he swallowed the battery from a fidget spinner.

Cody Stonestreet ,5, is recovering at the Children's Home in Pittsburgh.

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Doctors said he swallowed the entire circuit board of a fidget spinner, including the battery and lights.


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Since then, Cody had to go through several surgeries. He had a partially collapsed lung, pneumonia and was in a medically induced coma.

If his sister didn't see him playing with the fidget spinner, it could have been even worse.

"The battery if left in place gets stuck in that one place will actually burn a hole through the esophagus,” Amy Donaldson, a nurse practitioner, said.

"It must have happened for some reason maybe it's just to help save others,” said Tara Stonestreet, Cody’s mom, said.

On Thursday, the Consumer Product Safety Commission put out a renewed warning about its safety guidelines for fidget spinners.

The group said children under three should not use spinners and that the pieces can be choking hazards.

Children of all ages should not put fidget spinners in their mouth or play with a fidget spinner near their face.

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There have also been several reports of children choking on the metal pieces of a fidget spinner. 

A consumer advocacy group says Target is selling fidget spinners with hazardous levels of lead.

The U.S. public interest research group said the fidget wild premium spinner brass and metal contain as much as 330 times the federal limit for lead in children's products.

Target told business insider the fidget spinners aren't marketed as children’s toys, so they don't need to match that standard.

As for Cody, his family said that he is recovering well.


 

 

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