• Another synagogue shooting victim released from hospital, 2 more still being treated

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    PITTSBURGH - Eleven people were killed and six others, including four law enforcement officers, were wounded during a shooting Saturday morning at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood, authorities said. 

    UPDATE 10:03 A.M. Wednesday

    UPMC just issued an update on the victims of the Tree of Life Synagogue shooting. A 61-year-old female patient has been discharged from UPMC Presbyterian. A 70-year-old male patient and a 40-year-old male police officer remain in stable condition. 

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    THE SHOOTING

    Police swarmed the area of Wilkins and Shady avenues about 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27, after suspect Robert Bowers opened fire at the Tree of Life synagogue.

    STORY: Timeline of events at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh

    “These incidents usually occur in other cities. Today, the nightmare has hit home in the city of Pittsburgh,” Pittsburgh Public Safety Director Wendell Hissrich said.

    A Jewish bris, a circumcision ceremony, was taking place at the time of the shooting that killed 11 people and wounded six others. No children were killed.

    READ THE FULL COMPLAINT HERE

    Two police officers and two SWAT officers were among the wounded, officials said. 

    When SWAT officers entered the synagogue, Bowers went to the third floor of the building, according to the criminal complaint.

    During an exchange of gunfire there, two SWAT officers were both shot multiple times.

    While Bowers was being taken into custody, he made comments that he wanted all Jews to die and that they were committing genocide to his people, according to the criminal complaint.

    Residents were told to stay inside their homes and stay off the main roads as police responded and the investigation began.

    “This is the most horrific crime scene I’ve seen in 22 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation,” Bob Jones, special agent in charge of the FBI Pittsburgh, said.

    Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf said the shooting is being investigated by the FBI as a hate crime.

    RELATED: What we know about Shabbat services taking place at Tree of Life synagogue

    In a statement Saturday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the killings were “reprehensible and utterly repugnant to the values of this nation.”

    The crime scene will likely take up to a week to process and the FBI is getting assistance from several regional offices.

    There were three different locations where the victims were found, according to federal agents.

    Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald released a statement about the mass shooting where he describes the tense moments his wife experienced while walking near the Tree of Life Synagogue Saturday morning.

    “My wife, Cathy, set out shortly before 10 AM for her usual walk. Some days I join her, but more often than not, I am headed to events in other parts of the county. As Cathy headed up Wilkins Avenue, about 50 yards from Tree of Life, she heard the unmistakable pop pop pop of gunshots. Watching a police officer jump out of his vehicle and crouch behind it, she knew something awful was happening and turned and sprinted home."

    Read the full statement from Fitzgerald here.


    RELATED:


    WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE SUSPECT

     

    Robert Bowers, 46, entered the Tree of Life synagogue with one rifle, a Colt AR-15 model SP1, and three Glock .357 pistols, Channel 11’s Rick Earle learned. Initially, the ATF reported that all of the weapons were purchased and possessed legally by Bowers, but later they said further investigation was needed.

    Law enforcement negotiated with Bowers while he was inside the synagogue, sources said, and during those negotiations, he talked about his hatred for Jewish people. Bowers eventually surrendered.

    STORY: What we know about Robert Bowers, suspect in mass shooting at Pittsburgh synagogue

    Bowers, 46, was shot in the torso by police and was treated at Allegheny General Hospital. After be released into the custody of US Marshals he was taken to Butler County Prison where he will be held until his trial.

    Bowers appears to have made several anti-Semitic comments on social media website Gab and law enforcement is looking into those comments.

    “I was horrified to find out that this terrorist, this alleged terrorist, was on our site,” Gab CEO Andrew Torba told WBRE.

    Bob Jones, special agent in charge of the FBI Pittsburgh, said everything about the Bowers’ life -- including his home at an apartment complex in Baldwin, vehicle and social media -- will be looked at during the investigation.

    There is no knowledge that Bowers was known to law enforcement before Saturday, Jones said.

    A neighbor told Channel 11 that Robert Bowers was so nondescript that it almost made him unusual. The neighbor, who did not want Channel 11 to use his name, said Bowers moved into the apartment next door to him about two years ago. He said Bowers never gave any kind of indication that he was anti-Semitic or had tendencies toward hatred or violence.

    Bowers is charged with 44 federal counts of violence and firearms charges:

    • Eleven counts of obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs resulting in death
    • Eleven counts of use and discharge of a firearm to commit murder during and in relation to a crime of violence
    • Two counts of obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs involving an attempt to kill and use of a dangerous weapon and resulting in bodily injury
    • Eleven counts of use and discharge of a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence
    • Eight counts of obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs involving an attempt to kill and use of a dangerous weapon, and resulting in bodily injury to a public safety officer
    • One count of obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs involving use of a dangerous weapon and resulting in bodily injury to a public safety officer.

    Allegheny County also charged Bowers with:

    • Eleven counts of criminal homicide
    • Six counts of criminal attempted homicide
    • Six counts of aggravated assault
    • Thirteen counts of ethnic intimidation

    During his first court hearing on Monday, Channel 11's Rick Earle was in the courtroom and reported that Bowers showed no emotion.

    Through her pastor, Bowers' mother said she was horrified with the alleged actions of her son.

    Bowers pleaded not guilty on Thursday to federal charges that could put him on death row. It was his second brief appearance in a federal courtroom since the weekend massacre at Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill neighborhood. "Yes!" Bowers said in a loud voice when asked if he understood the charges.

    WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE VICTIMS

    Eleven people, none of whom were children, were killed in the shooting, authorities said.

    PHOTOS: Victims of the mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue

    STORY: What we know about victims killed at Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh

    STORY: Funeral service for last of 11 lives lost at Tree of Life synagogue to be held Friday

    • Joyce Fienberg, 75, of Oakland
    • Richard Gottfried, 65, of Ross Township
    • Rose Mallinger, 97, of Squirrel Hill
    • Jerry Rabinowitz, 66, of Edgewood
    • Cecil Rosenthal, 59, of Squirrel Hill (brother of David Rosenthal)
    • David Rosenthal, 54, of Squirrel Hill (brother of Cecil Rosenthal)
    • Bernice Simon, 84, of Wilkinsburg (married to Sylvan Simon)
    • Sylvan Simon, 87, of Wilkinsburg (married to Bernice Simon)
    • Daniel Stein, 71, of Squirrel Hill
    • Melvin Wax, 87, of Squirrel Hill
    • Irving Younger, 69, of Mt. Washington

    STORY: Condolences from Pittsburgh politicians, sports teams, officials nationwide

    Six other people, including two police officers and two SWAT officers, were injured.

    Timothy Matson is one of the Pittsburgh police SWAT officers who was hurt during the active shooter situation. 

    STORY: What we know about officers injured in synagogue shooting

    His brother and a fellow officer started a GoFundMe page to help pay for his medical bills and any other expenses during his recovery.

    PHOTOS: Vigils, services held in memory of Tree of Life shooting victims

    Of the six people wounded, four people were taken to UPMC Presbyterian Hospital, one person was taken to UPMC Mercy Hospital and one more person was taken to Allegheny General Hospital, a UPMC doctor said.

    The following update was provided Friday, Nov. 2 from UPMC about the victims being treated at Presby:

    WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE INJURED OFFICERS

    Four law enforcement officers were wounded in the shooting Saturday at Tree of Hope synagogue in Squirrel Hill.

    Timothy Matson is one of the Pittsburgh police SWAT officers who was hurt during the active shooter situation. 

    His brother and a fellow officer started a GoFundMe page to help pay for his medical bills and any other expenses during his recovery.

    (Source: Pittsburgh police Facebook)
     

    Daniel Mead was one of the first officers to arrive on the scene. He was treated for a gunshot wound and is now recovering at home.

    "When he went out, the shooter was there aiming gun at him. Blew through the glass and all he heard was 'pop, pop, pop' and he was hit," his sister Diane Mead told Channel 11.

    According to UPMC, the three other officers had all been released by Wednesday, Oct. 31. Below is the information about their injuries as reported by the Pittsburgh Department of Public Safety.

    • Timothy Matson -- Multiple gunshot wounds
    • Daniel Mead -- Gunshot wound to the hand
    • Anthony Burke -- Gunshot wound to the hand
    • Michael Smidga -- Graze wound and/or shrapnel wound to the head

    PRESIDENTIAL VISIT

    President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump visited Pittsburgh on Tuesday, the same day as the first funerals were held.

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    During the visit they stopped at the Tree of Life synagogue to pay their respects.

    The Trumps also visited UPMC Presbyterian where the injured police officers were treated. One of the officers, Daniel Mead, got to meet one-on-one with President Trump. His sister told Channel 11 that meant a lot.

    "There was healing going in the room, validation, of someone putting their life on the line and for a leader to come in and talk to them one on one... what it did for those men and their families was amazing," Diane Mead said.

    During the visit, neither Gov. Tom Wolf or Mayor Bill Peduto met with Trump. Peduto had expressed that the timing of the visit on the day of the funerals would be difficult due to the protection needed by the families and the security requirements for a presidential visit. 

    HOW YOU CAN HELP

    Officials are asking for people to step forward to give blood after Saturday morning’s deadly shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood.

    How to help victims of Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

    O-positive, O-negative and platelet donations are needed most, but existing and first-time donors with all blood types are welcomed, according to Vitalant, formerly Central Blood Bank.

    People who are as young as 16 (with parental consent), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in general good health may be eligible to donate blood, according to Vitalant.

    STORY: Blood donations needed to help victims of Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

    The Pittsburgh Penguins held a blood drive on Monday at PPG Paints Arena and during Tuesday's game against the New York Islanders more than $200,000 was donated to benefit the families of the synagogue shooting victims.

    A GoFundMe page has been set up for the victims and those affected by the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue. CLICK HERE to donate.

    Stronger Than Hate t-shirts are being sold online (CLICK HERE), as well as at Yinzers in the Burgh on Penn Avenue in Pittsburgh and Ithen Global on Broad Street in Grove City. All will sales benefit the Tree of Life synagogue.

    While there are many legitimate collections and donation opportunities, the FBI is warning about the possibility of fake fundraisers and scams.

    COURT PROCEEDINGS

    Bowers had his first court appearance on Monday, Oct. 29, and a judge ordered that he be held without bail. Bowers was transferred to Butler County Prison, which has an agreement with the Department of Justice to hold those awaiting trial on federal charges.

    The Butler County District Attorney told Channel 11 if it was his choice, Bowers would not be an inmate in the prison.

    "He's looking at not only a death sentence by the federal government, but he'll ultimately also be looking at a death sentence by the state," said Channel 11 legal analyst Phil DiLucente.

    PHOTOS: Sketches of synagogue suspect Robert Bowers in court

    On Wednesday, Bowers was indicted by a federal grand jury on 44 counts including obstruction of justice, use of a firearm to commit murder and obstruction of free exercise of religious beliefs. 

    He appeared for his arraignment on Nov. 1, and pleaded not guilty as well as requesting a jury trial.

    Local officials said they will let the federal court process progress before pursuing state charges.

    “Ideally, as with these previous prosecutions, the residents of our county would be the ones to sit in judgment of the individual charged with these crimes and should be given the opportunity to determine guilt and subsequent punishment,” Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen A. Zappala said in a statement. “In my experience, I believe this is clearly a capital case.”

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