Kabang, Philippines’ hero dog who lost snout while rescuing 2 girls, dead at 13

ZAMBOANGA CITY, Philippines — A dog that earned international fame for saving two girls from being hit by a motorcycle in the Philippines a decade ago died Monday. She was 13.

>> Read more trending news

Veterinarian Anton Lim, who has been taking care of Kabang since its original owner died in 2015, announced the dog’s death in a Facebook post.

“It is with profound sadness that I announce the demise of our hero dog +KABANG (February 2008-May 17, 2021.),” Lim wrote. “I found her lying motionless near her bed tonight.”

A street dog owned by Rudy Bunggal, Kabang became an international hero after she saved the man’s daughter and a cousin when the two girls were about to cross the street along Zamboanga City’s Nunez Extension in December 2011, The Straits Times of Singapore reported. Kabang leaped over the girls and took impact from a speeding motorcycle, the newspaper reported.

The dog’s face was embedded in the motorcycle’s front wheel, ripping her nose and the top of her jaw, KOVR reported. Lim took Kabang to the University of California at Davis’ School of Veterinary Medicine for treatment, the television station reported.

Veterinarians in California also discovered that Kabang had heartworm and a type of infectious cancer, according to KOVR. Surgeons in California were able to close Kabang’s facial wound after five hours of surgery, the television station reported. She returned to the Philippines in 2013.

“Kabang came to us for treatment in 2012 and stayed in our care for seven months. She was a courageous and loving dog,” UC Davis Veterinary Medicine tweeted on Monday. “We’re pleased to see she had a long life after returning to The Philippines in 2013. Our condolences to Dr. Lim and all who cared for her. Rest in peace, sweetheart.”

Lim said Kabang was a voracious eater until her death, The Straits Times reported. She finished her last meal at lunchtime, hours before her death.

“We are very sad about her loss. We will temporarily bury her in our backyard until the dog’s statue (at Roseller T. Lim Boulevard) shall have been completed,” Lim told the newspaper. “Then, we will transfer her there.”