No scam: Stimulus payment debit cards come in plain envelope that looks like junk mail

Treasury Department sending some stimulus payments on debit cards

The Internal Revenue Service is warning those who have not received their stimulus payments to check the mail. The debit card that the Treasury Department is sending is coming in a nondescript envelope that could be mistaken for junk mail or a scam.

The Visa debit card is being mailed in an envelope that reads “Money Network Cardholder Services,” the Detroit Free Press reported.

The card has the Visa logo on the front and a logo for MetaBank on the back.

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MetaBank is the Treasury Department’s financial agent, according to Market Watch.

About 4 million people will get their payments on the card, Fox News reported.

Some recipients may be confused by the mailing, figuring it was either junk or a scam and have either thrown away the card or destroyed it.

Jackée Dollar told the Free Press she hadn’t applied for a Visa debit card so she cut it up, not knowing that it was her government stimulus funds.

Dollar isn’t the only one who was confused.

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein has received complaints about the cards. Even his own mother wasn’t sure what the envelope from Money Network Cardholder Services was about, Stein told WFMY. He said if anyone in North Carolina has any questions to contact his office.

Another couple told WINK in Fort Meyers, Florida, they had cut up the card, then realized that it wasn’t fake. Thomas and Bonnie Moore said they were digging through their trash trying to find the pieces of the card after they realized their mistake, trying to put it back together. They said the card had no indication on it that it came from the Treasury Department or the IRS.


FILE PHOTO: Instead of checks like these, some people are getting debit cards for their stimulus payments. But those cards may look like junk mail.
FILE PHOTO: Instead of checks like these, some people are getting debit cards for their stimulus payments. But those cards may look like junk mail. (Eric Gay/AP)