• How to keep your New Year's resolutions this year

    By: Cox Media Group National Content Desk

    Updated:

    At the start of every new year, you may think to yourself, "I'm going to keep my New Year's resolution this year." 
    Except it rarely happens.

    Maybe you want to lose weight or be better at time management. Here are some tips on how not to fail after the first week of January.


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    Number one: Pick a realistic goal. Take baby steps by aiming to lose 15 pounds instead of 30. 

    Number two: If you want to shoot for a bigger goal, trick yourself by setting mini-goals. Instead of 30 pounds over six months, tell yourself that you want to lose 5 pounds each month.

    It works across the board. If you are trying to budget better in the new year, set lenient limits first and then challenge yourself to slowly live off less.

    Which leads to the third tip: Use an app to keep track of your progress. Mint is one app for money management. If you are trying to lose weight, check out Noom or Fooducate. If you are aiming for better time management, try Remember the Milk.

    Number four: Do it with a friend. Nothing says motivation like your best friend struggling alongside you.

    Number five: Celebrate your progress. Whether it's a cheat day, a glass of wine or a bubble bath, find a way to treat yourself for each solid week of progress you make.

    NEW YORK - JANUARY 01: (L-R) Orel De La Mota, 27, and Alexa Lowery, 25, celebrate New Year's eve in Times Square just after midnight on January 01, 2017 in New York City.


     

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