Here are positive things happening in our community (4/22/20)

Stories that make us smile (4/20/20)

PITTSBURGH — We know that the coronavirus pandemic is an overwhelming and stressful time for everybody, so we’re going to put together some positive things that are happening within our community to help those in need.

Have questions about the spread of the coronavirus? We have an entire section dedicated to coverage of the outbreak. CLICK HERE for more.

It’s apparent that during hard times, the Pittsburgh region always comes together to help one another.

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Local woman, customers sews thousands of masks for Pittsburgh police, first responders

When Gloria Horn called Pittsburgh Police and said she could sew masks for everyone on the force, they didn't think she could get it done so fast.

"We're so grateful because we would've run out of masks – disposable ones – and we're still waiting on an order," said Sgt. Tiffany Costa, who is in charge of community outreach.

Gloria's sewing studio on Castle Shannon Boulevard has been around for 36 years and is a big part of the community.

When she started seeing first responders at risk, Horn stepped up. And with help from her customers, they made 1,000 masks to give to Pittsburgh Police Wednesday.

The masks she gave to police are reversible: one side is black and the other features some Pittsburgh pride.

“We thought they needed to look respectable and so we put black on one side, but look at all the officers. They're all wearing the patriotic and the Pirates and Steelers on the outside,” said Horn.

Horn estimates they have given out more than 10,000 masks to first responders, nursing homes and home health care nurses.

You can get involved too. Horn is selling kits on her website here.

Local woman, customers sews thousands of masks for Pittsburgh police, first responders

Family turns dining room into hibachi restaurant for 18 year old’s birthday

A Lower Burrell 18-year-old couldn’t celebrate her birthday at an actual hibachi restaurant, so her family turned their dining room into one.

The Stoner family’s hibachi and grill was complete with menus and, of course, the tricks and volcano fire one would expect from a hibachi restaurant.

A Lower Burrell 18-year-old couldn’t celebrate her birthday at an actual hibachi restaurant, so her family turned their dining room into one.
A Lower Burrell 18-year-old couldn’t celebrate her birthday at an actual hibachi restaurant, so her family turned their dining room into one. (Viewer submitted/Viewer submitted)

Business makes 1,000+ masks for Pittsburgh police

A local business owner is helping to keep public safety workers safe.

Gloria Horn has owned Gloria’s Sewing Studio on Castle Shannon Boulevard for 36 years.

She and her customers sewed over 1,000 masks for the Pittsburgh Police Bureau. She’s given away even more masks to other first responders and nursing homes. She estimates about 10,000 in all.

You can help her efforts.

Gloria is selling her kids online on her website https://www.sew412.com/

Cranberry Township lights up to honor frontline workers

The Municipal Center will be lit every night and others in the community are encouraged to light their own homes and businesses to show appreciation for those directly dealing with the coronavirus.

Gold lights are shining on the municipal center Thursday through Sunday in honor of first responders, doctors and nurses.

The building is lit red, white and blue the other days of the week as a sign of American unity.

If you live in the township, you can submit your own pictures HERE.

To honor the efforts of first responders and healthcare workers, the Municipal Center will be bathed in light each evening, and the public is invited to light their own homes and businesses in solidarity.
To honor the efforts of first responders and healthcare workers, the Municipal Center will be bathed in light each evening, and the public is invited to light their own homes and businesses in solidarity. (Cranberry Twp. Communications Team/Cranberry Twp. Communications Team)

Runners participate in virtual marathon, raise $23K for American Cancer Society

The Pittsburgh Marathon was canceled, but runners have still raised $23,500 for the fight against cancer.

Runners had been raising money to support the American Cancer Society throughout the summer months while training for the marathon.

Even though the marathon was canceled, some runners kept on going, participating in a virtual race that allowed them to run a 5K, a half marathon or a full marathon.

“This year, roughly 80,000 Pennsylvanians will hear the words, ‘You have cancer,’” Dan Tobin, American Cancer Society Director of Communications, said. “Now, more than ever, many will turn to the American Cancer Society for information, resources, and services to help them navigate their cancer journeys. Money raised by these dedicated runners helps to fund those services and the lifesaving cancer research happening at institutions throughout our country.”