Local police chief accused of asking for sexual favors from women he pulled over

Local police chief accused of asking for sexual favors from women he pulled over

WESTMORELAND CO., Pa. — The police chief of Seward in Westmoreland County is facing criminal charges related to accusations that he pulled women over and let them go in exchange for sexual favors.

State police said Robert Baldwin met with the two victims multiple times, both in the borough and in neighboring towns.

Baldwin has since resigned as chief, but state police are worried there could be more victims out there.

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“It’s something that has us concerned. There’s other females that might be out there that he solicited some type of favors for, and if he did anything like that it’s a crime,” said Trooper Steve Limani, of PSP Greensburg.

The first woman knew she had citations and a suspended license. She told police she felt like she didn’t have any other choice but to appease Baldwin in fear she could be arrested.

Baldwin allegedly pulled her over in the area of Third and Thompson streets before telling her to go to a more private area under the overpass of 711. Police said he showed up the next day at her house — in plain clothes and off-duty.

“He would take advantage of these females being in an unusual spot. Whether it was a minor circumstance and he would try to do a quid pro quo when it came to him getting sexual favors, as that’s disgusting and against the law," Limani said. "And as a police officer I’m embarrassed I have to be talking about it.”

A second woman told investigators Baldwin approached her multiple times about making her drug conviction go away. She allegedly said he took her out on several occasions and claimed Baldwin forcibly kissed her.

Baldwin told Channel 11 he couldn’t comment and had to talk to his lawyer, but the mayor of Seward said his resignation will be discussed at the council meeting Tuesday night and that the borough is very disappointed in Baldwin’s actions.

The mayor said Baldwin will never work for Seward again. In the meantime, state police will be handling any calls until a potential police service contract is made with a neighboring township.

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