• New technology could more quickly track threats to students

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    MONROEVILLE, Pa. - The Gateway School District is considering a high-tech security upgrade.

    The district recently added metal detectors, thanks to a state grant of more than $25,000 for school safety.

    >>PREVIOUS STORY: Local school districts beef up security thanks to state grants

    Since Channel 11 reported on that grant last week, the superintendent announced a new way to advance school safety.

    "It’s a game changer; it’s something that can not only benefit public institutions of learning, but any business," said Dr. William Short, the superintendent.


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    School board members voted on the pilot program Tuesday night; Gateway is the only school district in the world to be chosen for the pilot.

    The technology can detect an active shooter and other possible threats.

    "Carnegie Mellon’s been working this over three years. We were lucky enough to be the company chosen to license this technology from Carnegie Mellon," said Andrew Moore, co-founder and CEO of CogXVision. 

    The hardware and software would be installed on the existing school security cameras.

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    "You train the modes, artificial intelligence models, to detect these things," said Sanjay Chopra, co-founder and chairman of CogXVision. "It's very hard for a security guard or a person to monitor so many cameras and so many things happening. Now, technology is doing the monitoring."

    If everything goes as planned, the pilot program could start as early as this fall.

    "Once we detect the shooter, the active shooter, we can track that shooter no matter where they go within that building and precisely send to the authorities where that individual is located," Moore said.

    Faculty members would get a map via text message showing them where the shooter is and what route to take to get away.

    "This is the first time that there is something to bring to market that’s different. They can actually help save lives," Moore said.


     

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